On the Shelf: parenting advice from Louisa May Alcott

Man, I love Little Women.  Ok, that’s an obvious statement, rather like saying ‘I enjoy breathing.’  I have yet to meet someone who’s read Little Women and not absolutely loved it.  Even Joey loves it:

What’s so great about the book is not only are the characters completely endearing, but the titular women in the story are way ahead of their time.  Ok, Meg, Jo, and Amy all end up with a guy, but their choices are theirs, and often unconventional.  Meg could have married Ned Moffatt and become a rich man’s wife, but she goes for John Brooke instead.  And one of the best moves in literature is Jo turning down Laurie.

I always loved the chapter ‘On the Shelf’, and it resonates even truer now that I am a parent.  In it, Meg is fretting over her twins playing mother-martyr and ignoring her husband, who looks for company (of a very platonic kind) elsewhere.  Meg eventually starts to miss him and get resentful, and Marmee tells her that John should have a hand in raising the kids too.  So Meg turns bedtime, which has heretofore been a struggle, over to her husband.  There is a battle of wills, but she wisely stays out of it, and ultimately Demi (their son) learns to go the f*ck to sleep, John gets more involved and stays at home more, and Meg is a hell of a lot less strung out..

We have a very skewed view of dads today.  They’re treated as secondary parents.  On sitcoms, even the progressive Modern Family, they’re the buffoons of the family who can’t do anything right (to be fair, I didn’t come up with that–I read it in an article once).  Then there are products like this:

Har har, Dad is so dumb he can’t do anything right!  He doesn’t know anything about childrearing.  You’re drunk, Dad.  Go play golf.

Except this becomes problematic for everyone.  Dads are marginalised in the family unit, and that’s a bad idea in general and especially when both parents work.  It leaves the mother playing the martyr role, taking on too much and trying to be superhuman when she is clearly a very regular human. (For the record, I absolutely see single moms as being superhuman because they have to play both roles.) Meanwhile, the kid never gets to feel the benefit of having both parents around and the family doesn’t come together as well.  I’m not sure why we treat dads as inept, but it’s a dumb idea which is seriously impairing the quality of family life and the equality of the sexes.  It implies that only women can rear children, and that’s problematic for a whole host of reasons.

Turns out, good ol’ Louisa May had the answer 150 years ago.  Let Dad help–he knows what to do.  It may not be exactly what Mom does, but it’ll get the job done, and just as well.  Then you can be a parenting team and make some serious strides for equality to boot, instead of being a martyr.  And being a martyr sucks because you work your butt off but no one thanks you for it anyway.

 

Postscript: For the record, MR is much more a John Brooke kind of dad.  He’s very involved, and it makes my life a lot more awesome.  Plus it’s super cute to see the Feliciraptor bond with him.  When his relatives comment in surprise about how involved he is, I stare at them in bemusement.  Of course he’s involved.  He’s her dad.

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Source: Shelf

Flow

I’m not very good at going with the flow.

It’s not that I don’t like the idea of going with the flow.  When I was a kid, I really liked that song ‘Que Sera, Sera’.  And who doesn’t love a bit of Enya to zone out to?  I dare you to listen to this and not feel relaxed:  It’s like a musical spa day.  I also love spa days.

The point is, I know how to unwind and bliss out, but I can’t *stay* that way.  I always start stressing again if I don’t have closure or don’t know the answer.  One of my childhood friends is on Facebook touting the virtues of following your bliss after (from what I can put together from her posts) giving up her career as a lawyer to become a yoga instructor/ life coach.  Part of me wants to roll my eyes at this, but it’s hard when she seems so honestly happy and chilled about life.

I want to be like that.  At least, I think it would lead to a calmer existence.  After being married three years I’m not as tightly wound as I used to be (sharing your life with someone will do that), but I still want to know how things will end up so my imagination doesn’t run wild with all the possibilities of what *could* happen.  I’m very good at coming up with dramatic, though highly unlikely, possibilities.  For example: if I go to the town where my ex-best friend lives, will I see her?  Maybe there will be a confrontation!  Should I play it cool or giver her a piece of my mind because I still don’t have closure from our last fight?  I run the scenarios through my mind like stories.  The problem is, like many good stories, they are engrossing because they are so stressful.  It’s like when I stayed up all night one time to try to find a good pausing point in The Hunger Games.  Note: It took something like reading 200 pages until 4am and practically falling asleep before I could close the book.  This is how I get about life.

That’s why pregnancy is such a special challenge.  I’m now in my final few weeks of gestating #2 and I’m at the point now where I’m ready to have this kid.  Problem is, I don’t know when, or how it will happen and there are so many variables.  What will happen to my two year old daughter while I’m in labour?  Who will take care of her, and how?  My personal plan A got turned on its head for a variety of reasons, and that was the one I liked because it was most predictable: she’d stay with a relative she frequently stays with and who not only loves her, but is excellent at upholding her little routines.  With plan B, I’m not sure how she will react.  I kind of know, but I don’t *really* know.

Then there’s the method of delivery.  The Feliciraptor was a c section, which means I could, in theory, demand a c section this time.  But then I don’t know how I’ll cope with staples in my stomach when I’m trying to manage a two year old.  On the other hand, it is what I know.  I know what the recovery is like and what the pain will be like, and generally how everything will go. And if I schedule it, then I *know* what will happen, which is comforting.  But I wouldn’t be able to drive for a few weeks, which means being stuck at home with a tiny baby and a two year old, and last time I found that very hard.

And speaking of post delivery, what will having two be like?  I know what it’s like to take care of a tiny baby (simple, really, but pretty boring), but I don’t know what it will be like dealing with two children.  Probably fine–after all, this is something a lot of people do with a very high success rate.  But *I* don’t know, so my mind ticks over with possibilities.  Will Felicity provide me with some company while her brother develops a personality, or will she make my days more monotonous?  What is it like to handle two kids having meltdowns for completely different reasons?

Last night I thought I had the beginnings of labour, but no dice.  As we drove to the hospital, though, I breathed a sigh of relief thinking that this was it; things were finally decided.  Only they weren’t, and now I’m in limbo again and finding new things to angst about.  For example, at my last doctor’s visit he agreed that I shouldn’t be induced, but I get stressed about the idea of being induced and back in hospital again for ages–even though that’s not going to happen and I have the power to refuse induction.

I posted a similar anxiety-ridden post when I was very pregnant with Felicity.  Now that post seems kind of silly–I had a pretty traumatic labour in the end, but she’s fine and I’m fine–fine enough to try this all over again.  People were lovely–I had lots of messages reconnecting me with friends who all sent words of reassurance.  This, however, is where I think the idea of flow comes in–if a river flows around you and you’re standing resisting it, eventually it’s going to tip you over and carry you along anyway.  Either the flow was too strong for you to fight, or you just don’t have the strength to keep resisting.  The other option is to lie back and float and see where the river takes you.  I really need to get used to option B, because the river’s given me an interesting ride.  And when I get on the lazy river at a water park, I love it.  As for exactly how to lay back and enjoy it when I want to steer and impossible to steer inner tube, well, there’s the rub.  But maybe I should try.

 

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Source: Flow

What I will not miss

So on Tuesday I’m being induced.  Despite some other panics I’ve had, I’m actually ok with this, because it means I get to end pregnancy and start motherhood, a transition I am  very much in need of.  I see people with babies and I get jealous, which is a bit ridiculous considering how I have a full grown baby literally on my person at all times.

Nevertheless, people have (in their lovely, helpful way) decided to bring out the horror stories about induction, which has perturbed my calm over the process/ excitement over the end a bit.  Also, my doctor said that sometimes it can be a lengthy process, and a) I could be in hospital for a week and b) I might have to have a c-section.  Given these less than optimal conditions, and the fact that I might be a bit stressed out when this little one needs actual care outside the womb, I thought I should write a list of things I will not miss about pregnancy, just to remind myself that whatever the process, this is all worth it, dammit.

  1.  The itching.  Dear God, the itching!!  My skin is stretching all over the place, thanks to a growing stomach and edema in my calves.  Mosquito bites have itched less, and I am a person who gets those mosquito bites which look like they might be the result of a biblical plague.  I have scratched my skin to the point where it’s gone raw, and creams and sprays provide some relief but it is only temporary.  Soon though.  Soon I will have something resembling a regular person’s body.  Speaking of edema, another thing I will not miss is…
  2. The swelling.  Everywhere is huge.  My chest, my stomach, my legs, my calves.  Edema, I have discovered, is incredibly uncomfortable, and if I keep my feet down at all they start to balloon in scary ways.  My bra size has gone from large (E) to comically jaw dropping (H) to ‘so mutant they barely make bras in that size’ (J).
  3. The pressure.  Pregnancy comes with all kinds of pressure.  There is the literal pressure of a baby pressing downwards, which makes it very uncomfortable to walk or climb stairs or basically move around.  Then there is the pressure of people.  People seem to feel they can prescribe when a baby is born, and I’ve had several tell me “You can’t have the baby this weekend, there’s x!” as though I had a choice in the matter.  That is a bit frustrating.  There is also the pressure I put on myself.  I’m a person who frets and worries when she learns of bad possibilities, and pregnancy is rife with them.  Knowing I had made it to full term with what seems a healthy fetus was an unspeakable relief.  I feel so much responsibility for this baby because she doesn’t even exist as a person outside of me yet, but I have so little control.  At least once she’s born I’ll be able to look at her and see how she’s doing.
  4. The poor quality sleep.  Oh man, sleep sucks right now.  I hate going to bed.  I’ve always hated going to bed, but now it’s really terrible because lying down is just uncomfortable.  I wake up several times a night because my hips hurt, or because I have to pee, or because I simply need to turn over, and that is an almost Sisyphian task.  It’s certainly moving a boulder, I’ll tell you that much.  I know that this baby will wake me up several times a night, but at least when I sleep, I’ll be able to sleep comfortably and well.  Plus, honestly, I wake up at least 5 times in a seven hour period, and I actually get out of bed at least 3.  Unless there is something wrong with her, I don’t think she’ll be getting up more than that.
  5. The inability to move.  Once upon a time, if I was sitting, I could just stand up.  I didn’t even think about it.  I just did it.  I’d be sitting, and then I’d be standing.  Easy.  Or if I dropped something on the floor, I just bent down to retrieve it.  Or if I had to go upstairs for something, I could get up and down quickly without it being a five minute project.  I know these things happened, and not even that long ago, but they feel like a myth from a distant past.  It’s exciting to think I’ll be able to get around easily again.
  6. The heartburn.  Man, I hate heartburn.  I never had it in my life until pregnancy.  Now MR says the baby will not be coated in vernix when she’s born (look it up, kids!), but Tum dust.  I’m inclined to agree.  I’ve learned how to control it with what I eat, but sometimes I really miss jalapenos.  Or just a little bit of spice.
  7. The restricted diet.  That brings me to all the other things I can’t eat.  Do you know how much I want goat’s cheese?  SO MUCH.  I salivate over eggs with runny yolks.  I’m not the hugest drinker, but dang it, I could go for a cocktail.  A nice Kir Royale (since bubbly drinks won’t give me heartburn anymore) or a mojito or a mimosa.  To be able to lick the bowl when I make a cake.  Sushi.  Man, now I’ve gone and made myself hungry for the world’s weirdest meal.  But even so, it won’t give me heartburn.

I realize this all sounds quite whingy and wussy.  In truth, I’ve had a pretty easy pregnancy, and I’m grateful for that.  I’m just…ready for it to be over so I can start the next phase, which is the really cool bit.  That’s the bit that lasts forever and yet constantly changes.  That’s the part where I have a daughter.  So while pregnancy was interesting, certainly, I wouldn’t say it was magical, and this list is to remind me of that, lest I kid myself into believing life was better at 9 months pregnant for whatever crazy reason my sleep deprived, hormone addled brain comes up with.

Pamper thyself

Prior to becoming pregnant, I was what you might call an admirer of beauty products.  I certainly found them alluring–I could easily spend ages in Lush and Sephora poring over products, and imagining how the potions and lotions might work their magic on me.  Occasionally, temptation would overcome me, and I would buy several products and bring them home.  I promised myself I would begin a new beauty regimen, but mostly the products just stayed on the shelf, looking attractive and promising but going unused.  I tended to favor things that were more overtly aesthetic, like clothes and makeup (what can I say, I’m a girly girl).

The same was true for spa treatments.  I love going to the spa, and swear I’m going to put aside money to make massages a regular treat for my tight shoulders, but it never seems to happen.

Since becoming pregnant though, all those theoretical treats (wouldn’t it be nice if I could have bright undereyes with no shadows?) have become real necessities.  One thing I have learned is that even easier pregnancies take over your body.  I’d consider myself pretty lucky–my morning sickness was just nausea, I was full of get up and go in my second trimester, I’ve not been incapacitated in the third.  But there are still a bevy of discomforts–heartburn, painfully swollen feet, a belly that itches horribly from stretching so much, painful, uncomfortable sleep.

MR very sweetly for my birthday in April bought all kinds of pregnancy comfort products, which really touched me, but in the back of my mind I wondered if I would use.  Turns out they’ve been essentials–stretch mark oil and foot spray and a pregnancy pillow that I literally could not sleep without.  Then I added to my stores with more foot and hand creams, and moisturizers for my stomach.  And I find myself using them daily like I never have before, and taking long soaks in the bath. I think in the past 9 months I’ve taken more baths than I have since I was a kid.

I’m coming to rather like the ritual of it, and one of the neat things is seeing the benefit.  MR is being a very good husband and massages my swollen feet, and every time he does that I see the difference.  Sleep is kind of a miserable experience at the moment, filled with pain and discomfort and what seems like hourly trips to the bathroom, but rubbing a bit of cool cream into my stomach to relieve the itching feels both relaxing and indulgent.

I think the takeaway here is that these little indulgent rituals are something worth preserving.  I’ve mentioned before how ‘experienced’ parents love to warn with wide eyes about how once you have a baby, say goodbye to everything, and how at breastfeeding class, they made me worry I would be a milk cow.  But even if I am, there’s five minutes to rub some cream into my feet, or sit with my husband and give him a neck rub, or have him give me one (I don’t think I can count on the foot rubs continuing post partem).  And it’s worth finding those five minutes to feel human again–or still, depending on how you look at it.

The Doom Squad

The past month or so has been full of intense preparations for giving birth.  My nesting instincts kicked in, and I meticulously organized all the baby clothes and created a spreadsheet for all the things we need to buy.  MR and I attended a round of birthing classes, and I started hypnotherapy in an effort to calm down about the impending labor.  I have to say, the efforts have paid off well.  I was nervous about giving birth (honestly, who wouldn’t be?), but now I feel much more equipped for it.  Plus, the subsequent conversations with MR all this preparation inspired have made me feel even better.

By the time our last NCT class (or birthing class, for those of you in the States) rolled around, I was feeling downright cheerful about the whole thing.  I had labor in hand, I felt–I had an arsenal of pain relief techniques, and if those didn’t work, I had an epidural.  Whenever I went to appointments, the midwives always said I was doing really well, and I didn’t even have gestational diabetes, which I was sure I was going to get.  Things were going to be ok.

Except.

I’ve planned to breast feed for awhile, really for as long as I’ve been planning to have kids.  It just seemed like the best alternative.  I don’t pass any judgment at all on women who choose to bottle feed, but as they keep saying how breast milk is best, it’s something I thought I should do.  Also, nature seems to have over-endowed me in that area to the point where it’s a bit annoying, so I thought it would be nice to put the things to their natural use.

What I didn’t know was that apparently, it’s not as simple as it looks.  This seems a bit unfair as other milk producing mammals don’t seem to have issues.  Heck, humans make use of cow, sheep, and goat milk on a daily basis, which says they can produce enough milk for their offspring and then keep going.  As I learned more about breast feeding, though, I learned that humans, for some reason, don’t have it so easy.  On top of that, because we are self conscious, perhaps too much for our own good, there are all kinds of theories about it.  Science says ‘breast is best’ which makes sense, but then some people take it to a whole other level and say that those women who say they have production problems simply don’t want it enough.  That kind of language weirds me out, because it’s the kind of phrasing they use in the Olympics.  “She’s extraordinarily gifted, but you just don’t see her wanting it enough.”  But the last time I checked, there was no competition for breastfeeding, and it doesn’t get your face on a Wheaties box.  (Sidenote: Are Wheaties still around?  They tasted an awful lot like cardboard.)  So then there are all these levels of superiority, and judging, and the implication that women who breastfeed are better mothers and much closer to their babies.  It’s all a little too intense.

Admittedly, most of this I’m getting second hand, from a friend who struggled to feed and couldn’t manage it, and was subsequently subsumed by guilt and saw accusations towards bottle feeders everywhere, especially internet forums (never the place to go when you’re having a personal crisis).  I can’t say I blame her for getting upset over what she read and heard and perceived–this post is essentially the same thing.  Nonetheless, her reports were enough to start making me nervous, although I tried to say to myself that my experience may be very different, even when she was talking about how much you have to feed to keep your supply up.  Maybe I wouldn’t have issues with supply?

But then other reports started to come in.  Other women I knew who just had babies reported how hard and tiring breastfeeding could be.  Then our NCT classes confirmed: pretty much for the first twelve days, the baby wants to eat every two hours, and will take a long time to do so, so you barely get a break between feeds.  There are a vast number of scientific reasons for this: the baby is learning, the mother is learning, the milk supply has to balance out and meet the demand, but none of this reassured me.  Instead raw panic gripped me.  I was essentially going to be a cow, existing only to milk.  I couldn’t type on my computer, or sew, or crochet, or do anything but stare zombie-like at the television and hope to catch half an hour of shut-eye in between feeds.  Of all the things about motherhood, this is the one that actually terrified me.  MR said I was having an existential crisis about it, which I think is pretty accurate.  That description of barely sleeping and constant feeding made me feel like I would lose every ounce of who I am.  Maybe I would get it back as things started to even out, but a fortnight of losing all sense of self is a rather terrifying prospect.  For the first time I began to worry about getting post partum depression.

In thinking about it, I realized there’s a certain amount of betrayal in that description.  I need some hope at the moment, something to look forward to.  Labor is not an exciting prospect, however prepared I feel for it, and now that I’m counting down these last four weeks and three days, pregnancy is really getting old.  I’m constantly uncomfortable, and can’t really walk anywhere.  I’d like to be able to stand up without a monumental effort, or crouch down without my knees singing out in pain, or eat without having ferocious heartburn.  I can’t remember what it was like to have a normal body.  But the baby was going to be the payoff, and that was what I was hanging on to.  To hear that the first couple weeks with her will turn me into a zombie was crushing, especially as I do not like anything zombie related.  (No, I haven’t watched the Walking Dead, and I don’t plan to.  It’s really not my thing.)

MR has mentioned before how new parents *love* to give advice and get all wide eyed as they impart dire warnings of impending misery.  He also points out that despite this misery, people seem willing to subject themselves to parenthood multiple times over.  This is something of a paradox.  Except it’s not–people in general love to complain and feel uncomfortable gushing.  And so I don’t even know if ‘experienced’ parents realize what they’re doing to people who are about to become parents.  I mean, I know it’s not going to be a bed of roses.  I’m going to have to deal with a lot of crap, both literal and figurative in just over a month, and that will continue for the rest of my life.  But in a way, that’s kind of beautiful–this little person is coming into my life, and she’s never, ever going to leave it.  No matter what happens, no matter how much she or I screw up, I will always be her mother and she will always be my daughter.  It’s irrevocable.  Early adulthood is full of fragile human bonds that seem to break so easily–fights with friends, relationships ending, and there’s an amazing security of parenthood.

Which brings me to my point–this isn’t going to be a horror movie.  Yes, it will be hard.  I’ve never done anything like it before.  But I have been sleep deprived.  I’ve pulled all nighters to finish papers; I’ve been on many, many transatlantic flights where sleep was impossible.  And breast feeding is probably a lot easier to pull off on no sleep than making incisive points comparing the depiction of childhood in Dickens and Twain.  I just wish people would *say* that.  A little encouragement would go such a long way.  Not the grim “You’ll get through it” that people seem to espouse as some form of motivation.  It shouldn’t be that way.  Tell me it’s hard, that’s fine, but also tell me that there’s some magic in there, something good.  No, I may not be able to write, or do much of anything, but tell me that really seeing your baby’s face and seeing your own features or your partner’s reflected in it is incomparable.  Tell me how happy all the relatives will be to meet the baby.  Tell me that somehow it brings you and your partner closer.  Tell me something good, for Pete’s sake.  Don’t you think I need to hear it?

Ultimately it was MR who got me realizing that there would actually be good stuff in the midst of the two week haze.  He said that whenever he announced a happy change, it was always met with an exhale of air and some dire warning.  When he got engaged, everyone who was married said “There goes your independence.”  When we bought the house, all the homeowners said “There goes your money.”  I don’t know if this is a British thing, or just a people thing, but it made me realize–getting married was stressful (and was made more so by certain Departments of Immigration which may or may not be shut down by government crises at the moment), but even with all the planning and rushing around the two days before the wedding, it was one of the best things I’ve ever done.  The best to date, really.  Moving house was again very stressful, and packing wasn’t much fun, but setting up our new house as distinctly ours was.  We bought all this great furniture and painted things how we liked them, and it felt really good to do that and build a home with someone.  And now I get to walk around the house and know that it’s *mine* (well, half of it anyway), and that I’m not answerable to any landlord.  So clearly the same is going to happen when we have this baby at last…isn’t it?  If you have any words of encouragement, I’d really like to hear them.

Laboring over labor

One of my best friends just gave birth.  We have that SATC kind of friendship where we share everything, so she was giving me a play by play, because in addition to being rather painful, it also seems like all the waiting gets really dull.  At the time, I was full of concern for her, but now that the baby’s here and she’s recovering (though she has an infection), my thoughts about labor are naturally turning towards myself, as I’m about to go through this in 15 weeks or so.  They can be summed up thusly:

AAACK!

My Facebook wall has had a lot of baby related stuff on it in the past year.  I suppose it’s because I’m at the age where a lot of people I know are having kids–fair enough, and actually, I like to see all the tiny babies and happy parents.  I even like it when people share baby related links, like one I saw today of a little girl who couldn’t quite talk yet but insisted on babbling fluently to her father on the phone as though she were having a real conversation.  Another where a couple took a video of their son every day for the first year of his life and then put 365 one second clips together for his first birthday inspired me to do the same when my daughter is born.  And dammit, my husband is helping me edit that stuff, say what he will about the effort. ;P

But today, there was a post with a very graphic drawing of a baby being born which reads “A human body can only bear up to 45 (del) unit [sic] of pain.  Yet at time of giving birth, a mother feels up to 57 del (unit) of pain.  This is similar to 20 bones getting fractured at a time.  Can u [sic] imagine it now, the mother’s pain and love?”

A quick google search reveals that this is not true, although the most reliable answer I could find did come from a blog itself.  That said, the arguments are logical: look up pain scales, and they normally go from 1-10, different people have different pain thresholds, and each woman experiences labor pain differently, depending on a myriad of factors, like the baby’s position for starters (one of the reason’s my friend’s labor was so long).  Also, the bad grammar in a trivia fact was already circumspect.  (Random note:  I’m much more about descriptive than prescriptive grammar, but if you want to sound like an authority on something, writing ‘u’ instead of ‘you’ is not the way to go.)

Nonetheless, this concept did unsettle me a bit since, as I mentioned, this is something I’m going to go through in a short while.  And it struck me that people don’t really talk about labor in detail.  If I had made this observation before getting pregnant I probably would have gone on a rant about how women are being oppressed and ‘women’s things’ are still taboo in society in a way men’s things never are.  Now I’m thinking that perhaps it’s a conspiracy of kindness.

Of course tv shows and films of the past generation or so love to show a lot of overexaggerated panting and women having their water break in inconvenient places and yelling obscenities at their partners for impregnating them.  But rarely do they show the truth of labor–it’s all done for camp or parody, or even in dramatic situations glossed over if labor is normal.  Alternatively, drama loves to dwell in all the bad things that can go wrong (anyone remember Sybill’s preeclampsia on Downton Abbey?  No?  That’s because you remember the season finale cricket game more, I bet.)

This is, I think, an act of mercy.  Childbirth is not something we talk about honestly because it’s not something that people can have an honest conversation about unless they’ve both done it.  Maybe mothers swap stories–I’m not sure, not having been one before.  Outside of that circle though, the conversation will never be productive.  Mothers won’t get the empathy they’re searching for because people can’t conceive of what it must be like, it’s such a unique experience.  The blog post which talks about the pain of childbirth has a long list of comments in which several men contend that getting a blow to the groin is as painful or more painful.  That one upsmanship is an example of the ignorance people who haven’t gone through it have.   On the other side of the coin, where I am, it’s just terrifying.  Obviously when my time comes, I’ll grit my teeth and find a way through, as every woman does.  But knowing beforehand that it could be days, that it’s hours of sweating and sobbing, that I could be on the verge of something scary, like a last minute c-section…I don’t think that knowledge is going to help me in any way.  It’s just going to make me more nervous, and already has, to a degree.  I’m all for openness and frankness, but sometimes, well–discretion is the better part of valor.  Giving birth is a valiant act, but the bravery of it lies in the fact that it is so inconceivable to anyone who hasn’t done it.